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Nantucket Baskets
Lot # 272 - Nantucket Baskets
American, first half 20th century. Two Nantucket baskets with swing handles, one stenciled on underside .2 / EAS; larger ht. 9.25 (including handle), dia. 8 in.
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Jean-Pierre Larocque (1953; Canada)
Lot # 63 - Jean-Pierre Larocque (1953; Canada)
Untitled (Horse) 
2005
Stoneware; ht. 27, wd. 31.5, dp. 9 in.

Larocque is proud of the fact that "horse people" do not like his work. Some are disturbed by the artist's disregard for equine fidelity in his art, but here, he chides them to remember that the work is first about being a sculpture, hence the struts and supports left in the finished work. The piece is distinguished by a remarkable textured surface, subtle tonal gradations from burnt sienna to black, and the workhorse's solid, unyielding presence. Larocque is a significant  artist leading the way in Canadian art.
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Documents Regarding Late War Movements of the Army of Northern Virginia
Lot # 86 - Documents Regarding Late War Movements of the Army of Northern Virginia
Lot of 7: General Orders No. 27, 5 Apr. 1864. "The army will be immediately placed in condition to march...." Includes schedule of transportation of equipment. By order of Gen. Lee, secretarially signed W.H. Taylor, signed by G.M. Sorrel. Three and a half, plus docketing, 8 x 12.5 in. sheets.

Note regarding officers' baggage. 29 April 1864, 1st A.C. "No order is known forbidding the use of trunks, provided their weight with their contents does not exceed the number of pounds allowed by orders from Army Head Qurs." By command of Lieut. Gen. Longstreet, secretarially signed G.M. Sorrel.

ANS, 23 April 1864. "I have the honor to notify you the Corps Hd Qurs. are today established at a point (in tents) 1/4 of a mile S. of Mechanicsville." Sgd. G.M. Sorrel.

Circular. H.Q. 1st A.C., 21 May 1864. Requesting all able bodied men to return to their companies. Sgd. G.M. Sorrel.

H.Q. 1st A.C., June 14, 1864. "The corps will move tomorrow morning to take position on Three Mile Creek a little South of the New Market Road." (On Sorrel's "onion skin" stationery.)

Aug. 11, 1864. "The Lieut. Genl. Comdg. desires you to move your Division at sunrise tomorrow morning to the vicinity of Culpeper C.H." Signed G.M. Sorrel.

Aug. 24, 1864. ANS G.M. Sorrel. To Kershaw. "Please keep your troops under arms for the present, but do not move them until further orders."

Joseph Kershaw, CSA

The following lots were in the possession of Major General Joseph Brevard Kershaw (1822-1894) when he was captured at Sailor’s (Saylor’s, Sayler’s) Creek, 6 April 1865. Kershaw was a native of South Carolina. A Joseph Kershaw who immigrated to North America from Yorkshire in 1750 served as a Colonel in the Revolution. Kershaw’s wife, Harriet, was a daughter of one of General Marion’s aides-de-camp. Thus, both families had a history of military service. Kershaw began practice as a lawyer in Camden, SC in 1844, but served a year as lieutenant of Co. C, Palmetto regiment, in the Mexican War. He was later a state representative and was sent to the convention which decided South Carolina’s secession, although Kershaw, himself, was reportedly opposed to it.

In February he was commissioned colonel of the 2nd SC Regiment, serving at Sullivan’s Island. Barely a week after South Carolina’s secession, Federal troops under Maj. Robert Anderson evacuated Fort Moultrie on December 26, 1860, moving to the as-yet-incomplete, but stronger, Fort Sumter. From Fort Moultrie and other points around Charleston Harbor, shelling of Fort Sumter commenced on 12 April 1861. Fort Moultrie was one of the few points to take return fire from Sumter. Fort Sumter fell later the next day, and the war had begun. Kershaw was then sent to Virginia. He was engaged at Blackburn’s Ford and First Manassas.

Although he had a bit of military experience, he was not trained as a military man.  Kershaw reportedly threw himself into learning everything about what is today called “military science.” The 2nd SC became known as one of the better trained Confederate units, and Kershaw one of the Army of Northern Virginia’s best officers. He was probably as close as any of the Generals came to the “gentleman-soldier” of southern myth, although it took a bit of time to grow into his position. (He appears to have gotten off on the “wrong foot” with Beauregard, for example. The two went their separate ways after Charleston Harbor.)  Kershaw was savvy enough to pay attention to those who “knew the ropes.”

The following February (1862) he was commissioned Brigadier General, and given command of a brigade is Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia. He stayed with Lee’s forces through the Peninsula, Northern Virginia and Maryland Campaigns, and was engaged with Lee at Gettysburg the following year. He then transferred to the West with Longstreet’s Corps where he was part of the charge at Chickamauga that destroyed the Federal right wing.

He returned to Virginia with Longstreet, was promoted to Major General and took command of a division in 1864 in the Wilderness, Spotsylvania C.H., Cold Harbor and Shenandoah Campaign. He was with Ewell after the evacuation of Richmond, during which he was captured three days before Lee surrendered. Other than those last few days, he was in the thick of the war from beginning to end.

The papers in the following lots were in Kershaw’s possession at that time. Most of them are dated 1864, when he took command of the division. Custis Lee, also captured at Sayler’s Creek, was immediately paroled. Inexplicably Kershaw was held for three months, as was Ewell.

 

G.M. “Moxley” Sorrel

George Moxley Sorrel (“Moxley”) (1836-1901) was a bank clerk in Savannah when the war began. He left his job to enlist for the Confederate cause. He was commissioned into General James Longstreet’s staff, and was present at the first major battle of the war, Manassas. A few days later, he was appointed acting adjutant general of Longstreet’s division. October 31, 1864, he was promoted to Brig. Gen. and given command of a brigade in Mahone’s division, A.P. Hill’s corps. It was likely at this time that Latrobe took over Sorrel’s position on Longstreet’s staff.  In one incident reported by Confederate Military History from Antietam/Sharpsburg, Longstreet and his staff came up on the Confederate center, which had been left with but a small regiment, the remainder sent to reinforce the left. There were two artillery, but the gunners were dead or wounded. Longstreet held the horses while his staff, primarily Sorrel and Latrobe, manned the guns, holding off the advancing Federals until reinforcements arrived, saving Lee’s army (and at least bringing the battle to a draw rather than a Confederate loss).  Not mere paper-pushers, these guys! And Sorrel would go on to be a good field commander – for a few months, until the end of the war.

Osmun Latrobe

Osmun Latrobe (1835-1915) was born in Mississippi, but attended Maryland Military Academy, and returned to Baltimore after the war. His grandfather, Benjamin Henry Latrobe, was the designer of the U.S. Capitol. His father, John H.B. Latrobe, was a man of many faces – inventor, lawyer, architect, philanthropist, and more. He succeeded Henry Clay as president of the American Colonization Society, helping to expand the colony of “Maryland in Liberia.” Osmun served on the staff of Gen. D.R. Jones until Jones’ death, when he transferred to Longstreet’s staff, as AAG and Inspector General, eventually becoming AG and Chief of Staff of the First Army Corps, replacing Sorrel in that role near the end of the war.

Walter Taylor

One of the “bigger” names here is that of Walter Taylor. From the time he reported for service in Richmond in May 1861, Walter Herron Taylor (1838-1916) was assigned to Lee’s staff as ADC and, later, AAG. Taylor was the perfect complement to Lee, handling administrative duties and correspondence, which Lee hated, with efficiency. When Lee was assigned the Army of Northern Virginia after Joe Johnston was wounded, he retained Robert Chilton and A.P. Mason from Johnston’s staff, and brought several, including Taylor, with him from Richmond. Lee reportedly kept his staff to a minimum (certainly increasing pressure on Taylor), to keep as many trained officers in the field as possible. This does show up on these papers. Lee orders every able-bodied man, including teamsters and cattle-herders to return to their units by 1864. Apparently one of Lee’s tactics by the summer and autumn of that year was defensive – stay put, dig in, and release many of these men for service on the front. If the wagons aren’t moving, you don’t need wagoners - they can man pickets, dig rifle pits and build roads. 

Taylor achieved such status that he seems to have occasionally signed papers for Lee, and had clerks signing orders for him (by command of Lee). Most of these are marked “(Sgd.) W.H. Taylor,” indicating that someone else signed them. The irony is that Taylor was such a high-ranking aide, that others signed his signature. Probably the reality is that so many copies of orders and other documents left Lee’s command, that, had Taylor signed all of them, he would have been crippled well before the end of the war!

Taylor (and several other aides, especially Charles Marshall) accompanied Lee to Richmond after the surrender at Appomattox Court House. Taylor’s own wife of just over a week was also waiting for him in there (Lee had allowed Taylor go to Richmond to marry Bettie Saunders on 2 April). On Easter Sunday, April 16, 1865, Taylor and G.W. Custis Lee (Lee’s son) were photographed by Mathew Brady on the back porch of Lee’s Richmond home, 707 E. Franklin St., in the now-famous series of photos. A majority of these orders have Taylor’s name on them somewhere, since Kershaw’s Division was in the First Corps of the Army of Northern Virginia.

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CSA Generals T.J. <i>Stonewall</i> Jackson, A.P. Hill & J.E.B. Stuart, Civil War Signed Field Document, with Additional CSA Officer Signatures
Lot # 74 - CSA Generals T.J. Stonewall Jackson, A.P. Hill & J.E.B. Stuart, Civil War Signed Field Document, with Additional CSA Officer Signatures
Extremely rare Civil War-date document referencing six Confederate Generals under the command of General Robert E. Lee: Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson, J.E.B. Stuart, Wade Hampton, A.P. Hill, R.H. Chilton, and J.H. Lane. Signed by Lee's two famous feuding Generals, Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson (1824-1863) and A.P. Hill (1825-1865). The document is also endorsed by future Generals R.H. Chilton (1815-1879) and James H. Lane (1833-1907). The document is framed with modern portraits of Jackson and Hill, and is accompanied by PSA/DNA Letter of Authenticity. 
 
Drafted by Colonel William M. Barbour of the 37th North Carolina, this official request was sent through the "Chain of Command" at the same time General Lee promoted General Jackson to Corps Commander, forming Lee's 2nd Corps with the rank of Lt. General. The 2nd Corps then made up the Western wing of the Army of Northern Virginia; whereas, Lt. General Longstreet headed up Lee's 1st Corps, forming the Eastern wing of the Army of Northern Virginia. 
 
It should also be noted that this document was in part due to the preparation for the events leading to the Battle of Fredericksburg, where, on December 11 and 12, Lee's armies pulled off a stunning victory against General Burnside's Army of the Potomac.
 
Then, just five months later, during the fierce night engagement at Chancellorsville, Jackson would be mortally wounded by his own men, and would eventually die on May 5, 1863. J.E.B. Stuart would take his command. A.P. Hill would be promoted to head the newly formed 3rd Corps, and in two years time, both he and Stuart would die of wounds received in battle. 
 
Colonel Barbour, author of this letter, was wounded in battle on September 30, 1864, and would eventually succumb to his wounds on October 3. 
 
Transcription, Letter: 
November 3, 1862
 
It has been certified to me that Martin V. Moore, of the 1st N. Carolina Cavalry commanded by Col. Baker, Hampton's Brigade, Stuart's Division, has been duly elected 2nd Lt. in Co. E 37th Regt., N.C. Troops, vice Lt. Bingham resigned. You will greatly oblige by forwarding this certificate of election through official channels that he may obtain the necessary authority to report for duty to my command. I do not know where to direct any communication & take this method of informing him of this election.
 
Will. M. Barbour,
 
Forwarded: 
 
Hd. Qtrs. 4th Brigade                                                            Nov. 7th 1862
 
Respectfully Forwarded
 
James H. Lane
Col. Comd. Brig
 
Hd. Qtrs. A.P. Hills Light Div.                                                 Nov. 8th 1862
 
Respectfully forwarded with the request that the Lieut. be ordered to join the company of which he has been elected Lieut.
 
A.P. Hill
Maj. Genl.
 
Hd. Qrs. V.D.                                                                         Nov. 10th, 1862
 
Respectfully forwarded
 
T.J. Jackson
Lt. Genl.
 
Hd. Qrs. A.N.V.                                                                      12th Nov. 1862
 
Respectfully referred to Maj. Genl. Stuart who will cause papers of discharge to be given & officer ordered to his Regt. by order Gen. Lee.
 
R.H. Chilton
A.A. & I.G.
 
Hd. Qrs. Cav. Division.                                                             14th Nov. 1862
 
Respectfully referred to Lt. Col Gorden commanding who will comply with the instructions from Gen. Lee by command of Maj. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart.
 
Norman R. Fitz Hugh
Maj. & A.A.G.
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Jim Keefer and Will Kirpatrick Decoys
Lot # 35 - Jim Keefer and Will Kirpatrick Decoys
Maine, late 20th century. A hollowed goldeneye hen, signed Jim Keefer, dated 1999, numbered 23/50, and loon with open beak, signed WEK (Will Kirkpatrick). Each hand carved and hand painted, having glass eyes and slightly turned heads; lg. 21.25 in. (larger decoy).
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Hayden Expedition Cabinet Photograph of Wasco Indian, <i>Oscar or the Little Vessel</i>
Lot # 341 - Hayden Expedition Cabinet Photograph of Wasco Indian, Oscar or the Little Vessel
Albumen photograph on a US Dept. of the Interior/Hayden Survey cabinet mount, titled in the negative Oscar or the Little Vessel, Wasco.
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Letter from Chief of Engineers, Army of Northern Virginia, Docketed by Sorrel
Lot # 89 - Letter from Chief of Engineers, Army of Northern Virginia, Docketed by Sorrel
ALS, 1p, Engr. Hdqrs. A. No. Va., 13 July 1864, signed with rank M.L. Smith, Maj. Genl. & Chf. Egr. To Lieut. Gen. R.H. Anderson, Commdg. 1st Corps, ANV. General Smith informs General Anderson that Kershaw's Pioneer Party will not be needed on the batteries west of the city, but their services were needed by Captain McDonald, Chief Engineer of the 1st Corps. Smith asks Anderson to inform Kershaw. On verso is an ANS dated 14 July by G.M. Sorrel informing Kershaw to send his men to Capt. McDonald.
 
Martin Luther Smith (1819-1866) was an 1842 USMA graduate (16/56). This was the class that produced 22 future Civil War generals. Smith served in Florida after graduation, primarily engaged in survey and cartography as an engineer. Although a native of Danby, NY, while in the South he met and married a Georgia native, and settled in the South to raise a family. Like so many other West Point graduates in the Civil War, he also served in Mexico 1846-1848. When war was imminent in 1861, he resigned from the Federal Army and received a commission as major of engineers in the Confederate service. He was appointed as colonel of the 21 LA Infy., and worked on the defenses of New Orleans, and later, Vicksburg. He was captured when the latter fell in July 1863 and spent seven months as a POW. After being exchanged, he was briefly head of the Engineer Corps for the entire Confederate Army, until his appointment as Chief Engineer of the A. No. Va. After the war he set up a civil engineering company. One of his positions was as chief engineer of the Selma, Rome and Dalton RR, in which he was serving when he died just a year after the end of the war.

Joseph Kershaw, CSA

The following lots were in the possession of Major General Joseph Brevard Kershaw (1822-1894) when he was captured at Sailor’s (Saylor’s, Sayler’s) Creek, 6 April 1865. Kershaw was a native of South Carolina. A Joseph Kershaw who immigrated to North America from Yorkshire in 1750 served as a Colonel in the Revolution. Kershaw’s wife, Harriet, was a daughter of one of General Marion’s aides-de-camp. Thus, both families had a history of military service. Kershaw began practice as a lawyer in Camden, SC in 1844, but served a year as lieutenant of Co. C, Palmetto regiment, in the Mexican War. He was later a state representative and was sent to the convention which decided South Carolina’s secession, although Kershaw, himself, was reportedly opposed to it.

In February he was commissioned colonel of the 2nd SC Regiment, serving at Sullivan’s Island. Barely a week after South Carolina’s secession, Federal troops under Maj. Robert Anderson evacuated Fort Moultrie on December 26, 1860, moving to the as-yet-incomplete, but stronger, Fort Sumter. From Fort Moultrie and other points around Charleston Harbor, shelling of Fort Sumter commenced on 12 April 1861. Fort Moultrie was one of the few points to take return fire from Sumter. Fort Sumter fell later the next day, and the war had begun. Kershaw was then sent to Virginia. He was engaged at Blackburn’s Ford and First Manassas.

Although he had a bit of military experience, he was not trained as a military man.  Kershaw reportedly threw himself into learning everything about what is today called “military science.” The 2nd SC became known as one of the better trained Confederate units, and Kershaw one of the Army of Northern Virginia’s best officers. He was probably as close as any of the Generals came to the “gentleman-soldier” of southern myth, although it took a bit of time to grow into his position. (He appears to have gotten off on the “wrong foot” with Beauregard, for example. The two went their separate ways after Charleston Harbor.)  Kershaw was savvy enough to pay attention to those who “knew the ropes.”

The following February (1862) he was commissioned Brigadier General, and given command of a brigade is Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia. He stayed with Lee’s forces through the Peninsula, Northern Virginia and Maryland Campaigns, and was engaged with Lee at Gettysburg the following year. He then transferred to the West with Longstreet’s Corps where he was part of the charge at Chickamauga that destroyed the Federal right wing.

He returned to Virginia with Longstreet, was promoted to Major General and took command of a division in 1864 in the Wilderness, Spotsylvania C.H., Cold Harbor and Shenandoah Campaign. He was with Ewell after the evacuation of Richmond, during which he was captured three days before Lee surrendered. Other than those last few days, he was in the thick of the war from beginning to end.

The papers in the following lots were in Kershaw’s possession at that time. Most of them are dated 1864, when he took command of the division. Custis Lee, also captured at Sayler’s Creek, was immediately paroled. Inexplicably Kershaw was held for three months, as was Ewell.

 

G.M. “Moxley” Sorrel

George Moxley Sorrel (“Moxley”) (1836-1901) was a bank clerk in Savannah when the war began. He left his job to enlist for the Confederate cause. He was commissioned into General James Longstreet’s staff, and was present at the first major battle of the war, Manassas. A few days later, he was appointed acting adjutant general of Longstreet’s division. October 31, 1864, he was promoted to Brig. Gen. and given command of a brigade in Mahone’s division, A.P. Hill’s corps. It was likely at this time that Latrobe took over Sorrel’s position on Longstreet’s staff.  In one incident reported by Confederate Military History from Antietam/Sharpsburg, Longstreet and his staff came up on the Confederate center, which had been left with but a small regiment, the remainder sent to reinforce the left. There were two artillery, but the gunners were dead or wounded. Longstreet held the horses while his staff, primarily Sorrel and Latrobe, manned the guns, holding off the advancing Federals until reinforcements arrived, saving Lee’s army (and at least bringing the battle to a draw rather than a Confederate loss).  Not mere paper-pushers, these guys! And Sorrel would go on to be a good field commander – for a few months, until the end of the war.

Osmun Latrobe

Osmun Latrobe (1835-1915) was born in Mississippi, but attended Maryland Military Academy, and returned to Baltimore after the war. His grandfather, Benjamin Henry Latrobe, was the designer of the U.S. Capitol. His father, John H.B. Latrobe, was a man of many faces – inventor, lawyer, architect, philanthropist, and more. He succeeded Henry Clay as president of the American Colonization Society, helping to expand the colony of “Maryland in Liberia.” Osmun served on the staff of Gen. D.R. Jones until Jones’ death, when he transferred to Longstreet’s staff, as AAG and Inspector General, eventually becoming AG and Chief of Staff of the First Army Corps, replacing Sorrel in that role near the end of the war.

Walter Taylor

One of the “bigger” names here is that of Walter Taylor. From the time he reported for service in Richmond in May 1861, Walter Herron Taylor (1838-1916) was assigned to Lee’s staff as ADC and, later, AAG. Taylor was the perfect complement to Lee, handling administrative duties and correspondence, which Lee hated, with efficiency. When Lee was assigned the Army of Northern Virginia after Joe Johnston was wounded, he retained Robert Chilton and A.P. Mason from Johnston’s staff, and brought several, including Taylor, with him from Richmond. Lee reportedly kept his staff to a minimum (certainly increasing pressure on Taylor), to keep as many trained officers in the field as possible. This does show up on these papers. Lee orders every able-bodied man, including teamsters and cattle-herders to return to their units by 1864. Apparently one of Lee’s tactics by the summer and autumn of that year was defensive – stay put, dig in, and release many of these men for service on the front. If the wagons aren’t moving, you don’t need wagoners - they can man pickets, dig rifle pits and build roads. 

Taylor achieved such status that he seems to have occasionally signed papers for Lee, and had clerks signing orders for him (by command of Lee). Most of these are marked “(Sgd.) W.H. Taylor,” indicating that someone else signed them. The irony is that Taylor was such a high-ranking aide, that others signed his signature. Probably the reality is that so many copies of orders and other documents left Lee’s command, that, had Taylor signed all of them, he would have been crippled well before the end of the war!

Taylor (and several other aides, especially Charles Marshall) accompanied Lee to Richmond after the surrender at Appomattox Court House. Taylor’s own wife of just over a week was also waiting for him in there (Lee had allowed Taylor go to Richmond to marry Bettie Saunders on 2 April). On Easter Sunday, April 16, 1865, Taylor and G.W. Custis Lee (Lee’s son) were photographed by Mathew Brady on the back porch of Lee’s Richmond home, 707 E. Franklin St., in the now-famous series of photos. A majority of these orders have Taylor’s name on them somewhere, since Kershaw’s Division was in the First Corps of the Army of Northern Virginia.

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L.A. Huffman, Signed & Hand-Colored Photograph, <i>Camp of Spotted Eagle's Hostile Sioux Tongue River Valley, 1879</i>
Lot # 349 - L.A. Huffman, Signed & Hand-Colored Photograph, Camp of Spotted Eagle's Hostile Sioux Tongue River Valley, 1879
Warm-toned, hand-colored silver gelatin photograph, 14.5 x 23.25 in. (sight), matted and framed, 22.75 x 31.75 in. Signed, dated, and titled by L.A. Huffman at bottom, Camp of Spotted Eagle's hostile Sioux-Tongue River Valley 1879. The Spotted Eagle Village was one of the last leather lodge villages encountered on the Yellowstone.
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Hand-Painted Shells
Lot # 37 - Hand-Painted Shells
American, late 19th century. Decorated with sail ships. 4.25 x 4 in. (each).
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Historical Staffordshire Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Plates
Lot # 187 - Historical Staffordshire Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Plates
English, mid-19th century. Two dark blue transferware plates by Wood & Sons depicting the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, one illustrating an incline, both within shell borders and marked on underside with incised company mark and stamped series title; larger dia. 10 in.
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Daguerreotypes of Men Related to the Turner Family
Lot # 29 - Daguerreotypes of Men Related to the Turner Family
Lot of 3, including a quarter plate daguerreotype of an unidentified couple, a sixth plate daguerreotype of William Henry Jones / taken 1854, and a sixth plate daguerreotype of John Edwin Jones / taken in 1857 just after his return from China. All housed in pressed-paper cases, the latter two with inked identification pinned to the pad.

The William Turner Family

Lots 1-29


Cowan’s is pleased to offer selection of items from the William Turner family of Newport, Rhode Island, some of which have been passed down several generations. Items offered in this sale include photographs, manuscripts, signed documents, relics, and uniform accoutrements, most related to the naval careers of prominent members of the family. Photographs and other items related to less noteworthy members of the family will be offered in our July 2 to July 13 American History Timed Online Only auction, and many more items from the family, including furniture, silver, scrimshaw, painted portraits, and other fine art and decorative items will be offered in Cowan’s June 20 Americana sale. Below are brief biographies of members of the Turner family relevant to this sale.

1st Generation: Dr. William Turner (1712-1754) grew up in Newport, Rhode Island where, according to family history, he studied medicine under Dr. Norbent Vigneron (French, 1669-1764). After completing his apprenticeship, Dr. Turner relocated to Newark, New Jersey, where he opened a successful professional practice. William married Mehitable Foster (b. 1715) with whom he had four children, including Daniel (1750-1837), and Peter (1751-1822).

2nd Generation: Daniel Turner (1750-1837), known as Captain Daniel, married his first cousin Sarah Foster (1754-1809) before serving in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War. Together, they had ten children, including William (1775-1837), Peter (1781-1812), and Daniel (1794-1850).

2nd Generation: Dr. Peter Turner (1751-1822), Captain Daniel's younger brother, served as a surgeon in the 1st Rhode Island Regiment of the Continental Army under General James Varnum (American, 1748-1789) and Colonel Christopher Greene (American, 1737-1781). Family tradition tells us that he served on General George Washington's staff at Valley Forge where he established a friendship with the Marquis de Lafayette (French, 1757-1834), who also stayed at Washington's encampment. Following the war, Dr. Turner and his wife Eliza Child settled in East Greenwich, Rhode Island at 21 Courthouse Lane, across the street from their brother-in-law General Varnum, whose wife Martha Child was Eliza's sister. Peter and Eliza had nine children, including Mehitable Foster (1780-1853).

3rd Generation: Commodore Daniel Turner (1794-1850), the son of Captain Daniel, began his career in the U.S. Navy as a midshipman at the age of fourteen, subsequently earning the rank of lieutenant on March 12, 1813. Two days later, he joined Oliver Hazard Perry's (American, 1785-1819) squadron at Sackett's Harbor, New York where he took command of the brig Caledonia in the Battle of Lake Erie. On September 10, 1813, Turner distinguished himself by providing suppressive fire for Perry's flagship Lawrence, thereby earning a Congressional medal and a sword from the State of New York. After serving under Perry's command on the frigate Java and the schooner Nonsuch, Turner commanded the USS Erie and the USS Constitution.

3rd Generation: Dr. William Turner (1775-1837), the son of Captain Daniel and the older brother of Commodore Daniel, served as a surgeon in the United States Navy. William married his first cousin Mehitable Foster (1780-1853), the daughter of Dr. Peter (1751-1822), and they had nine children, including Peter (1803-1871).

3rd Generation: Benjamin Bourne Turner (1780-1807), the son of Captain Daniel and brother of Commodore Daniel and Dr. William, appointed midshipman in the United States Navy Sept. 27, 1800, and lieutenant March 9, 1807. Unmarried, he was killed in a duel with Master John Rush, US Navy, Oct. 31, 1807, in New Orleans, over an argument about William Shakespeare.

4th Generation: Commodore Peter Turner (1803-1871) began his career in the U.S. Navy as a midshipman at the age of twenty, subsequently earning the rank of lieutenant on December 20, 1832. From 1834 to 1835, he served on the USS Columbus within his uncle Commodore Daniel Turner's (1794-1850) Brazil Squadron. He also served aboard the USS Constitution in the Pacific and afterward on special duty at Portsmouth Navy Yard. His final cruise was on the USS Southampton before serving as commander of the U.S. Naval Asylum in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was commissioned as a commodore in 1867. He married Sarah Stafford Jones (1826-1875) and had five children, including Hettie Foster (1850-1937).

5th Generation: Hettie Foster Turner (1850-1937) married Henry Harlan (1848-1898) and they had three children, including James Turner (1881-1931), through whose descendants the Turner family collection is being offered for sale.
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